Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Grieving’

th[1]One thing that brought joy in my widowhood, was traveling. My friends and family would agree, that it was hard to keep me from driving around the country. I had to keep moving in order to deal with the pain of grief. If these cruises were around at that time (over 20 years ago) you bet I’d be signing up!

Visit The Grief Toodlbox and find out about the 2018 Bereavement Cruise out of Tampa, Florida for a 5-night Western Caribbean Cruise:

 THE 2018 BEREAVEMENT CRUISE

GET YOUR REGISTRATION IN EARLY TO GET
THE BEST PRICE AND CABIN LOCATION. SEE LINKS BELOW!

I HOPE YOU WILL PLAN TO JOIN US.  PLEASE VISIT OUR EVENT WEBSITE TO LEARN ABOUT THE CRUISE AND TO REGISTER.  IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE LET ME KNOW. THANK YOU SO MUCH.
CALL:  LIN FINDLAY
315-725-6132

Click the link below to register for the Bereavement Cruise:
https://regisweb.cruiseplannersnet.com/rw/register/passengers/7828

Read Full Post »

Kids Camp offered through Crossroads Hospice Charitable Foundation

Do you know a child who is grieving due to a recent loss?   We still have openings for our Kid’s Camp sponsored by Crossroads Hospice Charitable Foundation!   Our camp is overseen by credentialed and licensed Clinical and Master’s level Social Worker and Psychology staff.  Our camp staff and volunteers are highly trained and specialize in grief and loss.    Kid’s Camp has designed fun, interactive activities for the children, age 6 to 12, to bond and share, play and gain tools to help them with their grief.

For some reason I couldn’t get the link to copy…so please go to the following website for more information. Sorry!

https://crhcf.org/Crossroads-Kids/

A place for grieving children to connect.

<!–

–>

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

I used to think people only grieved when a love one died. After my first husband died, I  learned more about grief. I realized people go through grief over many reasons. Perhaps if we know we’re going through grief, such as stages of depression or anger, we’ll realize there’s logic to why we feel the way we do. This short clip may bring more understanding to grief experiences from losses we may never have thought about…..

Read Full Post »

photo%20storefront[1]What’s on your agenda next Saturday….12/12/15???? Shopping???

Whether you’re shopping by the Mall of Georgia or wanting to escape the mad rush, please stop in and say “Hi” if you’re in the area. I’ll be doing my very first book signing at an actual book store next weekend. It’s a fairly large store so if you’re looking for shopping ideas and books fall in that category, please stop by, Books For Less, by the Mall of Georgia!

Books For Less: 2815 Buford Drive, Buford, GA 30519  “I hope to see you next Saturday (12/12/15) between 1 and 3 pm.”

Always a 20% discount on cash purchases for “A Widow’s Pursuit“. Buy one for someone struggling through grief over the loss of a loved one during this Christmas season. It may give them hope and encouragement to know that there’s more to life than grief!

Read Full Post »

A_Widow's_Pursuit_Cover_for_Kindle

“A Widow’s Pursuit” was released on November 3rd, 2015. I want to shout out, that I’ll be doing a book signing today, Saturday 11/7/15, at Espresso Theory in Duluth from 12 and 2 pm. Come on out and if interested in purchasing a book it will be on sale 20% off!

I’m including links for anyone wanting to purchase a book on the following websites:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Tate Publishing

If not able to make it today, I’ll be doing a 2nd signing next week at LATTEA on Saturday 11/14/15, in Duluth from 12 to 2 pm.  Hope to see you there!!

Read Full Post »

A_Widow's_Pursuit_Cover_for_Kindle“A Widow’s Pursuit” has found a publisher!

My book is being published with Tate Publishing and Enterprises, LLC.

Before the release date, I will be doing some book events to get the word out. I’ll have more updates to follow. If you know of anyone, who is not one of my blog followers, who may be interested, have them sign up for my e-mail list for future blog posts and updates on book events.

Read Full Post »

five-golden-stars-digit-star-icons-white-background-pointed-shiny-rating-rounded-corners-eps-34907363[1]Guest blogger, Jessica Kane has some helpful advice in dealing with loss, in her article, “5 Techniques for Coping with Death.” My favorites that helped me cope during my grief were numbers 3, 4 and 5 🙂 Of course #5 was my foundation in helping me cope in a healthier way than I could ever do myself.

5 Techniques for Coping with Death

Dealing with the loss of a loved one is one of the most difficult challenges that people face in life. According to the National Institute on Aging, prolonged mourning is unhealthy and can lead to anxiety and depression. It is important to take appropriate steps to proactively cope with the grief and pain. Below explains 5 ways to successfully cope with the loss of a loved one.

1. Understand Who Grieves the Most

The National Cancer Institute has detailed research on risk factors for grief and bereavement outcomes. They have found that those who lack social support, have a history of depression, a lower income and are pessimistic tend to suffer more. In addition to this, those who had an insecure or an ambivalent relationship with the deceased tend to experience more negativity and grief. People who tend to cope through overthinking almost always have higher levels of stress and depression. The younger the age, the more difficulty after a loss. Understanding your personal situation and being aware of your risk factors will help with coping.

2. Social Connections

Social interactions are very effective with normalizing emotions, improving mood and enriching overall quality of life. Socializing engages the mind, reduces stress and provides opportunities to bond with others. An active social life can actually improve nutritional intake because people tend to eat more when they are around others. In addition to this, being social can help lower blood pressure, boost the immune system and reduce the symptoms of depression. Sometimes those who are grieving tend to withdraw, avoid others and become sedentary. However, researchers at the University of Berkeley’s Greater Good Institute have found that socially inactive adults are 70 percent more likely to experience cognitive decline and related health issues compared with socially active adults. Being socially active results in excellent emotional and physical benefits.

3. Active Choices

According to the National Institute of Health, exercise and physical activity reduces stress, improves mood and prevents and delays disease. Being active is a key to dealing with the stress and grief while doing something productive. Physical activities can be simple things like gardening, dancing and housework. Exercise can be regularly scheduled specific physical activities such as jogging, cycling and lifting weights. Exercise has been proven as an effective treatment for improving cognitive functions and reducing the symptoms of depression. Exercise also decreases the likelihood of developing chronic conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure. Even walking 30 minutes a day will improve health and sleep quality while relieving anxiety and depression.

4. Travel

An ancient Chinese idiom says that traveling is better than reading 10,000 books. Many people coping with grief tend to withdraw and fixate on the past. However, travel forces us to be active, adapt to new situations and exposes us to the wonders of the world. Traveling forces us to engage others and experience life. Traveling locally or even internationally are excellent ways to leave the painful comfort zone at home and embrace the beauty of the world around us.

5. Spirituality and Religion

Most people only turn to religion during holidays or special events. However, there are benefits to both spirituality and religion. While there is great diversity with spirituality, yoga, tai chi and meditation have proven benefits for stress release and health. These aren’t just exercises, but actually ancient methods of spiritual practice and purification. Religion can play an important role in coping. While there is limited empirical research on the benefits of religion, studies have shown that religion is very helpful with coping because of the social support. Religion also provides a belief system that helps to understand and cope with death.

Jessica Kane is a professional blogger who writes for Legacy Headstones, a leading Ohio-based headstone manufacturer and vendor.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: